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Gold, Frankincense, and Myrrh

Gold, Frankincense, and Myrrh

January 6, 2022 | 131 words | Astrology, Philosophy, Religion

They were overjoyed at seeing the star, and on entering the house saw the child with Mary his mother. They prostrated themselves and did him homage. Then they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
(Mt 2: 10-11)

What are you doing, O Magi? Do you adore a little baby in a wretched hovel, wrapped in miserable rags? Can this child be truly God? Are you become foolish, o wise men? Yes, these wise men have become fools so that they may be wise.
(Bernard of Clairvaux)

For by gold the power of a king is signified, by frankincense the honor of God, by myrrh the burial of the body. And accordingly, they offer him gold as King, frankincense as God, myrrh as Man.
(John Chrysostom)

Robert J. Cavanaugh, Jr
January 6, 2022

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New Year’s Resolution

New Year’s Resolution

January 1, 2022 (218 words)

“A wonderful New Year’s resolution for the men who run the world: Get to know the people who only live in it.”

This tidbit comes to us courtesy of Martha Gellhorn (1908-1998), and American novelist, travel writer, and journalist who is considered one of the great war correspondents of the 20th century. She reported on virtually every major world conflict that took place during her 60-year career.

Ms. Gellhorn and her 1959 collection of essays, The Face of War, was recently described by contemporary writer Judith Mackrell this way:

“Gellhorn was a pioneer, a woman who challenged the prejudices of a misogynist military (as well as the ego of her husband, Ernest Hemingway) to claim her position as a frontline journalist. But Gellhorn was also a supremely humane writer. In her coverage of World War II, no less than in her reports from Spain and Vietnam, she wrote with heart-wrenching directness about the courage of individual soldiers and the catastrophic suffering of civilians.

“A fierce, fastidious stylist, Gellhorn still has the power to shock, not least in the unflinching account she gives of the sights, smells, and sensations of war. An even fiercer moralist, her work continues to drive home the message that wars are far less often fought on grounds of ideology than on cynicism and greed.”

Robert J. Cavanaugh, Jr
January 1, 2022

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